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Intro5pect - Record Profits

Intro5pect - Record Profits

$8.00


Description

Take the sing-along choruses of Anti-Flag, the bzzzzzts and beeps of the Faint and mix it with some Atari Teenage Riot and that’s Intro5pect to a T. The first Intro5pect release, the SOLD OUT self-titled 7-inch, released in 1999 was also GC Records’ first ever release…and we are now, ten years later, proud to join forces with A-F Records to bring you this new installment into the Intro5pect saga!
Released August 2009

TRACK LISTING

1 Work to Live
2 Fuck Your Flag
3 Sound is The Enemy
4 Collateral
5 The System
6 Turnaround
7 Plastic World

::PRESS::

Ten years ago, this intense band from southern California released it’s first self-titled 7? on Geykido Comet Records. This intense band is Intro5pect, they’ve been making music their own way for 12 years, after collaborating with punk rock vets such as Leftover Crack and Anti-Flag and releasing DIY music, they’re back with the Record Profits EP. And this is just a taste of what you’ll be hearing in Spring 2010 with the release of a full length. Record Profits blasts into your ears with “Work to Live”, a picturesque mix of punk guitars, pounding drums and a synth. This track will make you throw your fist while you’re dancing. Another stand out track in this EP is “Collateral”. This song is so intense, so honest and it includes clips from previous speeches by American presidents. Intro5pect holds nothing back, this song proves it. The EP ends with “Plastic World”. Sara Zaidi is putting up her middle finger, in a lyrical way with the help of guitars, drums and a keyboard. They have been proving themselves for over a decade, they aren’t going to stop and thank the punk rock gods for that.
Emily Hogan, Read At Your Own Risk blog

Musically speaking, Intro5pect was clearly way ahead of the curve. The band formed in the late ’90s to counteract what it saw as the virile spread of commercialization/corporatization in punk. Instead of hammers and sickles, the band wielded a then atypical combination of disparate musical forms. They tossed punk, pop, metal, and electronic music into their blender to yield a mutant strain of aggressive rock. A decade later, Intro5spect continues its revolution. Scores of bands now cherry-pick different styles to construct something musically new and different. Blame it on the wall-shattering and genre-collapsing effect of the Internet: bands attempt to juxtapose hip-hop, pop, and screamo. Thankfully, Intro5pect doesn’t go that far. Record Profits boasts seven songs that feature electronic beats and pop-punk choruses. Their lyrics read like laypeople versions of the Communist Manifesto or Society of the Spectacle (“Fuck Your Flag”). It’s interesting music for those who can stomach a mash of Atari Teenage Riot and NOFX.
Casey Boland, verbicidemagazine.com

Before going any further, it needs to be said that SoCal's Intro5pect sound exactly like the middle ground between political punkers Anti-Flag and the rapid-fire bpm dynamics of Atari Teenage Riot. If that sounds appealing, read on. Intro5pect's new EP, Record Profits, features seven songs of melodic punk sing-alongs set to keyboard trickery and one badass drum machine. Revolutionary ditties like "Fuck Your Flag" and "Sound Is The Enemy" could have been taken straight from an Anti-Flag album if it weren't for the Nintendo-on-the-fritz backbeats. The interchange of male/female vocals really does these songs justice, particularly those led by keyboardist Sara Zaidi's snotty snarl and melody-drenched lilt. Album closer "Plastic World" is one of the few times we can use the term "dance-punk" without getting that icky feeling afterwards.
Jason Schreurs, altpress.com

Back in 1999, the Faint had recently begun their transformation from a Braid-influenced post-punk band to an electronic-leaning dance-punk group, !!! had been tinkering around and releasing singles, and Big Audio Dynamite’s foray into techno-punk was over a decade in the past. But no act had successfully blended the tenacity and politics of punk rock with the programmed beats and synthesizers of electronic RPM until Intro5pect debuted on the fledgling GC Records with their Education 7-inch. After high-profile tours with the likes of Dead to Me, Citizen Fish and Leftover Crack, a full-length on A-F Records and an EP on Blacknoise with Stza Crack, Intro5pect returns to where it all started with Record Profits.
The seven-song EP gets going with what is likely to be one of the catchiest non-Orgcore songs of the year, “Work to Live.” The choppy `77 guitars are layered alongside 8-bit synths, blipping and bleeping over a driving digital rhythm. “Fuck Your Flag” smacks of a poppier Anti-Flag with male and female vocals, much like “Sound Is the Enemy,” a riff-heavy choral manifesto propelled forward by a breakneck beat, save for the chunky call-and-response breakdown that takes up the middle.
The band really hits their stride by the time “Collateral” comes around, thick with a rolling bassline and flittering percussion and made memorable with a booming chorus and sound bite collage that seems to take aim at every president since the invention of the microphone. “The System” is fairly baldfaced politically, with a chorus of “Fuck the system / Fuck the system / Fuck the system / Tear it down” but blends in some nice synth work, while “Turnaround” is the disc’s most straightforward punk number. Keyboardist Sara Zaidi takes charge of “Plastic World,” both vocally and instrumentally, as the Metroid-styled keys rise to dominance when she’s not singing about feeling constrained by the status quo -- er rather, not caring about feeling constrained by the status quo.
Intro5pect are in fine form on Record Profits, having finally figured out how to diversify their sound while still creating a patently individual style. The seven songs of Record Profits hurl forth with dizzying ferocity and don’t let up while showcasing the seamless blend of electronic dance music and digital punk that has become Intro5pect’s calling card.
GlasspipeMurder, punknews.org


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